Evan Stiger
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    Physical therapy and the healthcare industry are constantly changing. Every day there are new standards, technology, and innovations happening around the world. Pocket Nurse attended the 2019 American Physical Therapy Association Educational Leadership Conference (ELC) in Bellevue, Washington. The following are key takeaways from the conference.

    Guest Poster
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    When it comes to creating and running simulation scenarios, instructors have to choose whether to use actual medical equipment (such as thermometers, glucometers, bedside monitors, medication carts, and so on) or to use simulators that closely mimic medical equipment. One of the challenges in running scenarios with simulated participants, for example, is ...

    Evan Stiger
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    Simulation is a favored teaching methodology in healthcare education. As discussed in our previous posts, “What is Simulation” and “Why Use Simulation,” simulation allows students to build hands-on experience in a risk-free, safe environment. For all its benefits, adopting simulation can be difficult. The following best practices should be considered ...

    Pocket Nurse Education ...
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    Pocket Nurse founder and CEO Anthony Battaglia, RN, MSN, BSN, has been involved with nursing education and healthcare simulation since 1992. Having nurse educators on the team to familiarize Sales, Customer Service, and Marketing department employees has always been important to him. Current corporate nurse educators are Fabien Pampaloni, MSN, RN and ...

    Tina Greiff
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    During some recent water cooler office talk, a few co-workers were sharing some experiences of buying big-ticket household items. One had purchased a very expensive refrigerator, another bought a TV, and I had recently bought a sofa from an online retailer. Coincidentally, we all had issues that needed handled after the sale; two of us did not have the ...

    Nicki Murff
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    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 100 million Americans have diabetes or pre-diabetes (which, if left unchecked and untreated, can lead to Type 2 diabetes within five years). Though not as quickly as in previous years, diabetes cases are still actively increasing, and when cases of diabetes increase, risk of ...

    Kurtis Kabel
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    Brianna Banachoski, RN, is a nurse in the Hematology and Cellular Therapy Unit at West Penn Hospital.* She identifies as a lesbian, and uses she/her pronouns. She is also a cancer survivor; she has been in remission from non-Hodgkins lymphoma since 2016. Banachoski’s experience as a nursing student and nurse was colored by her identity and her cancer ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    With the class of 2019 prepared to enter post-secondary education and the workforce, many are looking for a stable career that offers opportunity and growth. Becoming a pharmacy technician is a good option. Job growth in this field is expected to increase by 20 percent through 2022.

    Dawn Mangine
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    A phrase that we keep encountering as we research and write about simulation is “cognitive load.”

    For students, cognitive load means the point at which there is so much information, they are no longer learning. In layperson terms, cognitive load means TMI – too much information! Our brains are only capable of absorbing so much at a time.

    Amanda Larkin
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    Although most hospitals and doctor offices now have digital blood pressure machines, it is still important to teach the basics of taking a manual blood pressure reading. When I was a nurse assistant, I was taught to take a patient’s blood pressure using a stethoscope and blood pressure cuff. Taking an accurate blood pressure on an actual patient was much ...

    Terry Kitchen
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    When a school is considering automated medication dispensing cabinets or carts (ADCs) for use in simulation education, they typically want to use the type of ADCs that are found in their local hospital system. This way, students will easily be able to adapt to real-life medication dispensing once they graduate and start their careers.

    Nicki Murff
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    It’s official. As of January 31, 2019, all CPR manikins used in American Heart Association (AHA) adult CPR courses must feature an instrumented directive feedback device (IDFD). Devices such as these provide real-time, audio-visual feedback as the CPR is being performed, allowing student performance to be evaluated in an immediate and ongoing ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    Phlebotomy is the surgical puncturing of a vein to collect and draw blood, whether for laboratory tests or blood donation. Employment in this healthcare profession is projected to grow 25 percent through 2026. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that demand will remain high in this job as doctors and other healthcare professionals require blood ...

    Jayme Maley
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    When you graduate from Nursing School, you think you have learned all the skills you need to be prepared for working in the real world. Whether you’re working in a hospital, nursing home, or doctor’s office you know all your hard work, all the classes, clinicals, late-night study groups, and tests have prepared you for what’s ahead.

    Kurtis Kabel
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    Currently, there are more than 39 million people in the United States that are age 65 years or older. This number includes over 2.4 million people who openly identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer. As the baby boomer generation continues to age, caregivers for LGBTQ elders need to be sensitive to the concerns and history of LGBTQ ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    Occupational therapy asks: “What matters to you?” instead of “What’s the matter with you?” It’s a prime example of what differentiates occupational therapy from other physical therapy programs. Occupational therapists (OTs) focus on what is important to a patient, and they identify the important and valued activities that the patient will encounter in ...

    Katy Mogg
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    We are always aware of being thankful for first responders, especially our EMS cohorts. This year, after working with Ross/West View EMS, we learned of some not-so-obvious reasons to be thankful for them, too. Many first responders take on roles that you don't see every day, but which inform their skills and care. Sure, we recognize the blue ...

    Nicki Murff
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    In the age of social networking abundance, with sites like LinkedIn and Twitter providing constant industry updates and opportunities to connect, it can seem as though all our professional networking needs are already met. However, joining a simulation-related, in-person networking group and attending events can provide benefits in addition those ...

    Evan Stiger
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    In August of 2017, the American Heart Association (AHA) issued a directive that will take effect on January 31, 2019 requiring the use of a feedback device in all their adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses. These devices should “provide learners with real-time, audio-visual corrective feedback on aspects such as compression rate, depth, and ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    In order to fight the threat of antibiotic and antimicrobial resistance (AR/AMR), the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are heading up an effort to meet the AMR Challenge. CDC officials think pharmacists can play a vital role in addressing and preventing antibiotic ...

    Kurtis Kabel
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    Simulation has seen many milestones and advances over the years. In a 2013 NCSBN multi-simulation national study, evidence was presented to show that nursing education can substitute clinical time with simulation without harming the educational outcome and learning aspect for the students. It’s not only colleges and universities that can benefit from ...

    Anthony Battaglia and ...
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    Simulation-based education has been defined as using standardized participants (SPs), High-Mid-Low fidelity simulators, and medical equipment to afford students an opportunity to be presented with a set of conditions and evaluate problems realistically. The student is required to respond to the problem(s) as he or she would in real life. The decisions ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    The last line between a patient and medication errors is at the pharmacy. Pharmacists and pharms techs are accessible and trusted healthcare providers, and they catch a lot of mistakes before harm can come to patients. However, 21 percent of medication errors that affect patients may stem from dispensing errors at the pharmacy, so extra vigilance can be ...

    Todd Vreeland
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    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) as a career has come far since the National Academy of Sciences 1966 white paper, Accidental Death and Disability: The Neglected Disease of Modern Society. Our first two generations of leaders, educators, providers, and medical directors have brought us a long way, but in comparison to the other fields of medicine, we ...

    Nicki Murff
    Featured post

    Using moulage in your in-class simulations can be one of the best ways to prepare students for what to expect in their clinical positions. When students have the chance to encounter a situation within the safety of a simulation, they can ask questions and hone their response skills. We’ve prepared a short moulage how-to video and step-by-step to assist ...

    Bailey Salvati
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    With 350,000 people suffering cardiac arrest outside the hospital and over 200,000 suffering cardiac arrest in a hospital setting, the ability for people (both bystanders and medical professionals) to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation, commonly known as CPR, correctly has become critically important. If CPR is performed accurately and immediately, ...

    Nicki Murff
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    First responders encounter traumatic scenes every day, whether they are arriving to the scene of a car accident, responding to a domestic or sexual violence situation, or serving a community in the aftermath of a natural disaster. In cases like these, it is crucial that emergency personnel respond to the victims, survivors, and family members with ...

    Nicki Murff
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    This week, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made headlines when it approved its first pharmaceutical drug derived from the marijuana plant. Epidiolex®, from GW Pharmaceuticals, is an oral medication made of cannabidiol (CBD), one of the chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. Unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another cannabis ...

    Kurtis Kabel
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    In 2017, data from a national Center for American Progress (CAP) survey showed that 14 percent of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) patients had experienced discrimination based on their sexual orientation or gender identity, and that they had avoided or delayed crucial medical assistance because of this type of discrimination from a ...

    Justina Luckey
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    Pharmaceutical compounding is a way of creating customized medication. Compounded medications are made by combining ingredients in the exact strength and dosage formulated for an individual patient. Compounding is used when a patient is allergic to a component of a medication, or to present the medication in a different form – instead of a capsule, a ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    Pharmacists used to be the medication authorities in white lab coats who dispensed relief from behind high counters. They were seldom called on to interact with patients. For that matter, they seldom collaborated with other health care providers; it was a very segmented industry, with doctors handing out orders, and patients expected to follow them ...

    Katy Mogg
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    Katy Mogg, who was Tradeshow Coordinator in 2018, had the privilege of tagging along to observe the Ross/West View EMS Division on one of their quarterly training weekends. During the exercise, she learned what it takes for an educator to create teachable moments in the midst of simulated chaos. Below are a few tips for making a mock ...

    Guest Poster
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    The decision to complete an RN-MSN program led me to Robert Morris University, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and into healthcare simulation at the Research and Innovation in Simulation Education (RISE) Center. I was part of an initial expansion where part-time instructors were hired to supplement a growing simulation schedule, even though at the time, I ...

    Todd Vreeland
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    Realistic formative and summative scenarios are how we in EMS education fulfill the mantra, “Train like we fight.” Formative scenarios reinforce the learning process with perfect practice by providing frequent and accurate feedback to ensure automatic delivery of the skills (NREMT, 2015). Summative scenarios are used to evaluate a student’s ability to ...

    Jayme Maley
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    Once the tool of assassins and murderers, cyanide is now a highly regulated drug. However, while cyanide is hard to obtain for any type of political intrigue or anonymous poisoning (think of the still-unsolved 1983 Tylenol murders in Chicago), it is a toxic by-product of burning building materials. As such, EMS professionals and other first responders ...

    Anthony Battaglia
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    At Pocket Nurse®, we make it our goal to enhance suitable learning environments for future healthcare professionals.

    As part of this responsibility, which we take very seriously, we make a point to attend trade shows that focus on nursing education, simulation in healthcare, EMS training, pharmacy education, and other areas of professional healthcare ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    Caregivers have a few tools and guidelines to manage polypharmacy, which is taking five or more medications daily. Polypharmacy affects older patients the most because of their age and a significant burden of decreased physical functioning. Adverse drug events (ADEs) lead to an increased risk of falls, increased delirium, more hospital admissions, and in ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    The term “deprescribing” first appeared in medical literature in 2003. It describes the practice of backing off a prescribed medication when doses are too high, or stopping medications that are no longer needed. Deprescribing is a strategy to deal with polypharmacy, which is taking five or more medications daily.

    Dawn Mangine
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    Although our primary audience is made up of nurse educators, we strive to bring to light important topics for educators in other fields as well, such as EMS instructors and allied health educators. In addition, we don’t want to use this space to brag about what we know and how we can solve your problems – we actively reach out to other experts and give ...

    Evan Stiger
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    Airway management is one of the most important jobs for pre-hospital care providers, but it isn’t always as straightforward as placing an endotracheal tube (ET). For example, how do you place a tube while the patient is vomiting? One answer is the SALAD technique, as developed and defined by James DuCanto, MD, staff anesthesiologist and Director of the ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    Allied health professions are those professions that deal with health care, and include many well-known non-nurse, non-physician roles. Among these professions are physical therapist, anesthesia technician, dental hygienist – and many, many more. Allied health professionals work in the healthcare system to provide diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, and ...

    Dawn Mangine
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    The United States Pharmacopeial Convention’s Chapter 800 (USP 800) provides guidance for personnel handling of hazardous drugs; it was published in February of 2016, and will become effective in the next two years. Before USP 800, guidelines for compounding preparations differentiated between sterile and non-sterile preparations (USP 797 and 795), but ...

    Evan Stiger
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    Healthcare experiences exponential technological improvements each year. In order to prepare students for their clinical rotations and entry-level positions, simulation must advance just as quickly. Educators must keep in mind advancements as they gain prominence among services. Here are some of our favorite innovations from EMSWorld Expo 2017.

    Guest Poster
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    An interview is an important step in evaluating candidates and making the best hiring decision for a team. Whether you are interviewing at a school, for an internship, or for a professional position, the interviewer is going to cover these five areas. Be prepared to talk about yourself, and be comfortable with revealing your personality, knowledge, ...

    Todd Vreeland
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    Established in 1970, the mission of the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) is to develop and administer certification exams that measure the competency of emergency medical services (EMS) providers in the United States. Since most states require NREMT paramedic certification before they will issue a license to practice, the NREMT ...

    Evan Stiger
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    Workplace violence is an obstacle for healthcare professionals, and shouldn’t be ignored or labeled “part of the job.” Nurses must be able to provide care without concern for their personal safety. It’s in the best interest of the healthcare professional, facility, and patient to take steps to avoid workplace violence.

    Guest Poster
    Featured post

    The foundation of healthcare simulation is patient safety. In the not-so-distant past, students learned primarily from lectures and textbooks, with a smattering of skills practice before being ushered into the clinical setting and assigned a real, live patient to apply what they had learned. By introducing hands-on training in the safety of a simulation ...

    Dawn Mangine
    Featured post

    Up until about the 1950s, compounding pharmacies were typical in communities across America. Medications were made locally by compounding techniques – most of which still exist. Today, most medications are mass produced by major pharmaceutical companies, which is quicker, less expensive, and gets medication to more people.

    Dawn Mangine
    Featured post

    Simulation supports many healthcare careers: nursing, EMS, pharm tech, and allied healthcare among them. One of the challenges for medical simulation is going to be attracting and retaining educated and experienced people who want careers in simulation. A career in medical simulation combines adult learning, clinical education, technology, and ...

    Evan Stiger
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    Opioid overdoses are a huge concern in the United States despite the growing availability of the reversal drug naloxone. The synthetic sedative carfentanil has worsened the crisis by appearing in recreational narcotics. Its potency endangers the emergency responders treating overdose victims.

    Dawn Mangine
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    Sepsis is an increasingly serious healthcare puzzle. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that between one million and three million Americans are diagnosed with sepsis annually, and 15 to 30 percent of them will die. Sepsis most commonly occurs in patients over 65, but children and people with compromised immune systems are ...

    Evan Stiger
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    EMS instructors are changing programs in favor of more immersive, hands-on learning, which challenges students to think quickly and creatively. With limited time and resources, scenario-building can have all the urgency of a medical emergency. EMSWorld suggests the best scenarios are built on simple questions.

    Dawn Mangine
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    The International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) is the leading global association focused on improving patient safety through excellence in healthcare simulation. Through their journal, Clinical Simulation in Nursing, webinars, and conferences, they are dedicated to the science of healthcare simulation.

    Dawn Mangine
    Featured post

    Simulation is the perfect step between the classroom and clinical experience with actual patients. However, even simulation has limitations, precisely because it’s not real. It gives students limited realistic human interaction. Simulation lacks the presence of physiological symptoms, and, knowing that no one is at risk, students may not take it ...

    Jayme Maley
    Featured post

    EMSWorld Expo is not only an opportunity for faculty and students to learn about industry dynamics, but it also allows vendors and distributors to better understand challenges facing EMS programs. Getting this understanding is vital so that companies like Pocket Nurse can be part of the solution for EMS programs and careers.

    Beth Telesz
    Featured post

    By now, with the notorious pink explosion that October brings, most people are well aware of the prevalence of breast cancer. These pink attention grabbers are meant to serve as reminders to schedule doctor and mammogram appointments, perform self breast exams (SBEs), recognize survivors, and remember people who have lost their lives to this disease.

    Anthony Battaglia
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    In healthcare settings, hand hygiene is the single most important measure for preventing the spread of infection. Healthcare-associated infections, including those caused by multi-drug-resistant organisms (MDRO), are a significant global problem and challenge within U.S. healthcare facilities in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost. Antimicrobial ...

    Dawn Mangine
    Featured post

    With opioid addiction and overdose deaths on the rise, the demand for solutions is growing. As a result, the use of Narcan (brand name naloxone) has been made more widely available in communities across the United States. Many, although not all, states allow EMTs to carry and administer Narcan. But naloxone should not necessarily be a first responder’s ...

    Dawn Mangine
    Featured post

    One challenge in simulation is teaching medication management, dosing information, and administration. In the past, instructors had to search out expired medication and buy oranges in bulk (oranges being the stand-ins for injectable flesh). But let’s face it, expired meds are dangerous to use in simulation. And oranges are for eating, not injecting.

    Dawn Mangine
    Featured post

    While epinephrine has been in the news lately because of the skyrocketing costs of the EpiPen®, a lesser known problem with the administration of this life-saving medication is ratio expressions. Many life-saving resuscitation drugs, including lidocaine, epinephrine, and sodium bicarbonate, are expressed in ratio concentrations (1:1,000 or 1:10,000), and ...

    Dawn Mangine
    Featured post

    1. An aging population that is also more chronically ill

    By 2030, 20 percent of the American population will be 65 years or older and more diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, and other cultural and socioeconomic factors. They will also have more chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, rather than needing ...